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The Student News Site of Parkland High School

The Trumpet

The Student News Site of Parkland High School

The Trumpet

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How one ESL student emphasizes the importance of the LIEP

A+globe+to+represent+the+many+different+languages+and+cultures+here+at+Parkland.
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A globe to represent the many different languages and cultures here at Parkland.

The Language Instruction Educational Program (LIEP)  is a vital part of Parkland that allows students who have a first language other than English to have a full education. According to the May 2022 program description, the purpose of LIEP is “to ensure that English learners are empowered with the skills necessary to become independent and successful students and to fully participate in Parkland’s educational opportunities.” This curriculum was designed to be flexible, so there are multiple pathways an English as a Second Language (ESL) student can take. These include mixed classes, classes where only English is used, and one-on-one instruction. Students are assigned an instructional level that helps place them in a curriculum appropriate to their English abilities.
Mrs. Ashraf is one of the teachers here at Parkland who is a part of the LIEP. She upholds the program’s goal of allowing students to “become independent learners in a school environment that affirms linguistic and cultural diversity.”

The Trumpet decided to sit down with one of her students, Othman Alhussein (12), to gain a perspective on his experiences as an LIEP student.

Interviewer: What is your first language?
Alhussein: Arabic
Interviewer: Does your access to Arabic make English easier or harder to learn?
Alhussein: I actually learned English back in Iraq. My mother and father were pretty keen in English, they were both teachers.
Interviewer: What do you think is the most challenging part of being an ELL student?
Alhussein: Fitting in. It’s a new thing, you know?
Interviewer: Do you feel like Parkland supports you?
Alhussein: Yeah, absolutely. They help me a lot.
Interviewer: Is there anything non-ELL students can do to help support you better?
Alhussein: My American friends help me out a lot. Other students should try to help them out with the Chromebook thing. We never had Chromebooks back where I came from, you know? Another thing they could help out with is their classes, and figuring out schedules.

Alhussein is just one unique individual, but his advice can be taken by everyone. It can be confusing to enter a whole new culture and try to assimilate, especially in high school. The Trumpet encourages readers to lend a helping hand to those who are adjusting and to learn something new from their classmates who have their own stories and knowledge to share.

This article was previously published in a print edition.

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Raina Pawloski, Staff Writer
Raina Pawloski is a senior and this is her first year as a Staff Writer on the Trumpet. She enjoys writing, reading, and baking. Raina plans to major in English and Communications in college and pursue a career in journalism, publishing, or film production.
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